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Jaguars players head to Mexico to help promote youth health and fitness at the Tochito Flag Football

20180321-NFLM

From March 17-18, Jaguars linebacker [Myles Jack](http://www.jaguars.com/team/roster/myles-jack/4e6c0242-751b-42dd-aefd-57586f525ff4/ "Myles Jack") and fullback [Tommy Bohanon](http://www.jaguars.com/team/roster/tommy-bohanon/a1218dae-575e-4724-a392-c7feff7e8ea6/ "Tommy Bohanon")teamed up with NFL Mexico to engage new fans and promote youth health and fitness during a Tochito Flag Football Tournament and an NFL Play 60 activation in Morelos, Mexico.

“I had a fantastic time with NFL Mexico and all of the boys and girls that participated in the flag football tournament,” Jack said. “Football plays an integral part in who I am today, so it was great to be able to share my experiences with everyone in Mexico. The people of Mexico were extremely welcoming and I enjoyed learning more about the culture and interacting with everyone that I had the privilege of visiting.”

The National Flag Football Tournament featured 11- and 12-year old boys and girls at Oaxtepec, Morelos, Mexico. The competition included 26 teams out of the 32 states in Mexico that competed for the championship title. The final game came down to Mexico State, which represented the Jacksonville Jaguars, versus Coahuila State, which represented the Steelers. The Jaguars defeated the Steelers by one by a final tally of 27-26.

The NFL Mexico Flag Football Program continues to expand its reach and is now in 28 out of 32 states, has more than 9,500 co-ed teams in different age brackets and 2.5 million kids playing Tochito in schools as part of their physical education. American Football has made its mark in Mexico and is now the second-most popular sport behind the game of soccer. 

Jack and Bohanon also had the opportunity to immerse themselves in Mexican culture during a tour of Toetihuacan, learning the history behind pyramids, temples and the symbolic meaning of the jaguar in Mexico. For more than 3,000 years, the jaguar has been Mexico’s most enduring symbolic animal and prowls the art of most ancient Mexican civilizations from the Olmec to the Aztec.

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